4 Bays, 4 Splittys and 1 Ghia

QUESTION: What happens when 4 Bays, 4 Splittys and 1 Ghia get together?

ANSWER: A great atmosphere and support for our cause!

Thanks to the Paintscrapers VW club who came out to the Island Gardens Park …

VWs in the Park, photographed by Sharon Read, edited by Carole Brown.

… and thanks to my green Brazilian splitty, too, here seen in close up …

For more about this wonderful photo shoot in London see http://vw4causes.org/2012/10/21/iod-photoshoot/

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A classic favourite

I like this Karmann Ghia that came to visit me this past weekend. In fact a whole crew came to my London neighbourhood, the Isle of Dogs.  All drove classic VW buses, except this brave soul who drove a convertible. After the rainy summer we’ve had it was a miracle it stayed fine for us to photograph these wonderful classic vehicles!

VW Karmann Ghia pictured on the Isle of Dogs, east London. Across the Thames sits the Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich. Copyright 2012 ButlerBrownMedia

More photos can be seen at the event on our sister site at http://vw4causes.org/2012/10/21/iod-photoshoot/

Isle of Dogs Event – 20th Oct 2012

Be the first to spot our Green Split Window bus  (ABW xxxL) around Canary Wharf and Island Gardens, London E14 midday-ish today (Saturday 20 October 2012) and then tweet our full number plate and post a photo on our Facebook page to win a car sticker of ‘The YesWeCan CamperVan no.1

Bumper sticker

If you tell us what MG stands for, we’ll enter you for a bumper prize !!! 🙂

A maiden voyage

With the focus on making posters for my bus exhibition for MG Awareness, I completely forgot that it was to be the VW bus maiden voyage in Great Britain.

getting ready for maiden voyage; Paul said the bird poop was lucky, but I wanted to wash the bus for its first trip

Which meant it was also my first time driving it !!!! How could I have overlooked that minor detail? And it was over 100 miles from the Bedford area to Grill-n-Chill at The Hop Farm in Kent …

Carole’s ist time driving the Brazilian bus

On that drive down the M1, M25, M20 and a little country road (of which I do not know the number because every time I slowed for a traffic light or roundabout, the engine cut out!!) I  discovered this VW is nothing like my smooth 1971 VW Westfalia. This Brazilian built split window has a different everything: engine, brakes, gear positions, pedal positions and angle, steering, seats, steering wheel position, noise insulation, windows, mirrors; and it has NO rear view mirror and NO heat.

What does all that mean in practice?????

It means:

  • it loves to go into reverse gear instead of 2nd!!!
  • you have to REALLY step on the brakes because they are drum brakes and neither are they power assisted as in my 71 Westfalia
  • the braking distance is twice as far!
  • the clutch pedal is so steep my arthritic left knee no longer feels the pain because it’s dead!
  • the steering is baggy, baggy, baggy (where did you say the white line was?)
  • the driver’s seat is so low that the steering wheel becomes a boob carrier 🙂
  • the steering wheel is so high it almost hits yer chin!
  • the lack of insulation anywhere in the van, means the engine noise is amplified in the cargo space and is deafeningly loud
  • the lack of ventilation up to the front windscreen means I need to open windows
  • the windows slide so it’s a new manoeuvre instead of turning a handle (just one more thing to learn as I’m driving as fast as I can to get to the show in Kent)
  • the mirrors are small circular things that show almost nothing behind
  • the lack of a rear view mirror is positively dangerous as I have to turn around each time I need to change lanes (but at least I have no blind spots in a 15 window bus)
  • without heat it is so cold to drive in the English weather!!!!

BUT … despite all of the above ….

  • I did make it to the Grill-n-Chill VW Show at The Hop Farm in Kent

meeting my gracious host, Anton; notice the signs in the back of the bus!!!

  • it’s amazing, as with all VWs, there is just something about them that captures your heart !!!!

P.S. This story also published on sister site VW4causes (Vehicles Working for Causes) at http://vw4causes.org/2012/09/25/a-3rd-to-celebrate-driving-a-vw-bus-on-its-maiden-voyage/ … with more photos and chatter on using the 15 window bus to tell an important story

 

When two working VWs meet

Two VW women working on different projects, yet both using their vintage 1971 VW buses to tell stories, met at San Jose State University on 23 April 2012.

Image

Copyright by Julia Weber 2012. Thanks for permission to re-post this photograph.

Here you can see Julia Weber’s ‘Mr Orange der Story-Bus’ and Carole Brown’s ‘The YesWeCan CamperVan’ getting close and sharing some thoughts on future possibilities!  Maybe they’re talking about where to drive together …. if the ladies agree that is ..

 

Type 2 VW bus (T2)

Here’s the third part of our story on the Type 2 VW bus, taken from Wikipedia.

[ source Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_Type_2 ]

Volkswagen Type 2 (T2)

1973–1980 Volkswagen Kombi (T2) van

1973–1980 Volkswagen Kombi (T2) van

Production August 1967 – July 1979 (Europe and US)
1971–1996 (Mexico)
1976–present (Brazil)
1981–1986 (Argentina)
Assembly Hanover, Germany
Emden, Germany
General Pacheco, Argentina
São Bernardo do Campo, Brazil
Puebla, Puebla, Mexico
Platform Volkswagen Transporter T2
Engine 1.6 L 35kW B4
1.6 L 37kW B4
1.7 L 46-49kW B4
1.8 L 50 kW B4
1.8 L 67 kW I4
2.0 L 52kW B4
Transmission 4-speed manual
3-speed automatic
Wheelbase 2,400 mm (94.5 in)
Length 4,505 mm (177.4 in)
Width 1,720 mm (67.7 in)
Height 2,040 mm (80.3 in)

In late 1967, the second generation of the Volkswagen Type 2 (T2) was introduced. It was built in Germany until 1979. In Mexico, the Volkswagen Combi and Panel were produced from 1970 to 1994. Models before 1971 are often called the T2a (or “Early Bay”), while models after 1972 are called the T2b (or “Late Bay”).

This second-generation Type 2 lost its distinctive split front windshield, and was slightly larger and considerably heavier than its predecessor. Its common nicknames are Breadloaf and Bay-window, or Loaf and Bay for short.[15] At 1.6 L and 35 kW (48 PS; 47 bhp) DIN, the engine was also slightly larger. The new model also did away with the swing axle rear suspension and transfer boxes previously used to raise ride height. Instead, half-shaft axles fitted withconstant velocity joints raised ride height without the wild changes in camber of the Beetle-based swing axle suspension. The updated Bus transaxle is usually sought after by off-road racers using air-cooled Volkswagen components.

The T2b was introduced by way of gradual change over three years. The first models featured rounded bumpers incorporating a step for use when the door was open (replaced by indented bumpers without steps on later models), front doors that opened to 90° from the body, no lip on the front guards, and crescent air intakes in the D-pillars (later models after the Type 4 engine option was offered, have squared off intakes). They also had unique engine hatches, and up until 1971 front indicators set low on the nose rather than high on either side of the fresh air grille – giving rise to their nickname as “Low Lights”. The 1971 Type 2 featured a new, 1.6 L engine with dual intake ports on each cylinder head and was DIN-rated at 37 kW (50 PS; 50 bhp). An important change came with the introduction of front disc brakes and new roadwheels with brake ventilation holes and flatter hubcaps. 1972’s most prominent change was a bigger engine compartment to fit the larger 1.7- to 2.0-litre engines from the Volkswagen Type 4, and a redesigned rear end which eliminated the removable rear apron. The air inlets were also enlarged to accommodate the increased cooling air needs of the larger engines.

In 1971 the 1600cc Type 1 engine as used in the Beetle, was supplemented with the 1700cc Type 4 engine – as it was originally designed for the Type 4 (411 and 412) models. European vans kept the option of upright fan Type 1 1600 engine but the 1700 Type 4 became standard for US spec models.

The year 1971 also saw exterior revisions including relocated front turn indicators, squared off and set higher in the valance, above the headlights – 1972 saw square-profiled bumpers, which became standard until the end of the T2 in 1979. Crash safety improved with this change due to a compressible structure behind the front bumper. This meant that the T2b was capable of meeting US safety standards for passenger cars of the time, though not required of vans. The “VW” emblem on the front valance became slightly smaller.

photo taken by Carole Brown of a 72 Bay window bus and her own 1971 on the right showing the differences in position of signal lights, size of VW logo and shape of front bumper

References

11. ^ Dolan, Matthew (22 September 2009). “To outfox the Chicken Tax, Ford strips its own vans”The Wall Street Journal.

12. ^ “The Big Three’s shameful secret”Freetrade.org, Daniel J. Ikenson, 6 July 2003.

13. ^ a b c Ikenson, Daniel. “Ending the “Chicken War”: The case for abolishing the 25 percent Truck Tariff”. The Cato Institute.

14. ^ a b c Bradsher, Keith (30 November 1997). “Light Trucks increase profits, but foul air more than cars”The New York Times. Retrieved 27 May 2010.

Likes and VW bugs

Our post two days ago brought several new people to view this blog, which was really great because I’ve been writing this for over two years now and wondering how to continue to interest readers.

One of our new likes was from Bandwagen, who share our love of photography and VWs.

Here’s a cracking photo from their site of a beautiful VW beetle that won a competition in the UK way back in 1986, the first year that the CAL look was a new category at VW Action, Europe’s biggest Volkswagen show.


Winning Pink VW Beetle! Photo courtesy of bandwagen.wordpress.com

P.S. I often notice how our interest in others’ articles or the reasons we write our own are because of connections. In this case I’m connected in three ways: I am a Brit, writing this from California and my interest in vintage VW beetles has been recently kindled!