Type 2 VW bus (T2)

Here’s the third part of our story on the Type 2 VW bus, taken from Wikipedia.

[ source Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_Type_2 ]

Volkswagen Type 2 (T2)

1973–1980 Volkswagen Kombi (T2) van

1973–1980 Volkswagen Kombi (T2) van

Production August 1967 – July 1979 (Europe and US)
1971–1996 (Mexico)
1976–present (Brazil)
1981–1986 (Argentina)
Assembly Hanover, Germany
Emden, Germany
General Pacheco, Argentina
São Bernardo do Campo, Brazil
Puebla, Puebla, Mexico
Platform Volkswagen Transporter T2
Engine 1.6 L 35kW B4
1.6 L 37kW B4
1.7 L 46-49kW B4
1.8 L 50 kW B4
1.8 L 67 kW I4
2.0 L 52kW B4
Transmission 4-speed manual
3-speed automatic
Wheelbase 2,400 mm (94.5 in)
Length 4,505 mm (177.4 in)
Width 1,720 mm (67.7 in)
Height 2,040 mm (80.3 in)

In late 1967, the second generation of the Volkswagen Type 2 (T2) was introduced. It was built in Germany until 1979. In Mexico, the Volkswagen Combi and Panel were produced from 1970 to 1994. Models before 1971 are often called the T2a (or “Early Bay”), while models after 1972 are called the T2b (or “Late Bay”).

This second-generation Type 2 lost its distinctive split front windshield, and was slightly larger and considerably heavier than its predecessor. Its common nicknames are Breadloaf and Bay-window, or Loaf and Bay for short.[15] At 1.6 L and 35 kW (48 PS; 47 bhp) DIN, the engine was also slightly larger. The new model also did away with the swing axle rear suspension and transfer boxes previously used to raise ride height. Instead, half-shaft axles fitted withconstant velocity joints raised ride height without the wild changes in camber of the Beetle-based swing axle suspension. The updated Bus transaxle is usually sought after by off-road racers using air-cooled Volkswagen components.

The T2b was introduced by way of gradual change over three years. The first models featured rounded bumpers incorporating a step for use when the door was open (replaced by indented bumpers without steps on later models), front doors that opened to 90° from the body, no lip on the front guards, and crescent air intakes in the D-pillars (later models after the Type 4 engine option was offered, have squared off intakes). They also had unique engine hatches, and up until 1971 front indicators set low on the nose rather than high on either side of the fresh air grille – giving rise to their nickname as “Low Lights”. The 1971 Type 2 featured a new, 1.6 L engine with dual intake ports on each cylinder head and was DIN-rated at 37 kW (50 PS; 50 bhp). An important change came with the introduction of front disc brakes and new roadwheels with brake ventilation holes and flatter hubcaps. 1972’s most prominent change was a bigger engine compartment to fit the larger 1.7- to 2.0-litre engines from the Volkswagen Type 4, and a redesigned rear end which eliminated the removable rear apron. The air inlets were also enlarged to accommodate the increased cooling air needs of the larger engines.

In 1971 the 1600cc Type 1 engine as used in the Beetle, was supplemented with the 1700cc Type 4 engine – as it was originally designed for the Type 4 (411 and 412) models. European vans kept the option of upright fan Type 1 1600 engine but the 1700 Type 4 became standard for US spec models.

The year 1971 also saw exterior revisions including relocated front turn indicators, squared off and set higher in the valance, above the headlights – 1972 saw square-profiled bumpers, which became standard until the end of the T2 in 1979. Crash safety improved with this change due to a compressible structure behind the front bumper. This meant that the T2b was capable of meeting US safety standards for passenger cars of the time, though not required of vans. The “VW” emblem on the front valance became slightly smaller.

photo taken by Carole Brown of a 72 Bay window bus and her own 1971 on the right showing the differences in position of signal lights, size of VW logo and shape of front bumper

References

11. ^ Dolan, Matthew (22 September 2009). “To outfox the Chicken Tax, Ford strips its own vans”The Wall Street Journal.

12. ^ “The Big Three’s shameful secret”Freetrade.org, Daniel J. Ikenson, 6 July 2003.

13. ^ a b c Ikenson, Daniel. “Ending the “Chicken War”: The case for abolishing the 25 percent Truck Tariff”. The Cato Institute.

14. ^ a b c Bradsher, Keith (30 November 1997). “Light Trucks increase profits, but foul air more than cars”The New York Times. Retrieved 27 May 2010.

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