Thank GOD for …

My top three appreciations are for:

  1. WordPress for its wonderful blogging software and the philosophy of programmers sharing their skills for free;
  2. Facebook for the networking and opportunities to grow support for my campaign for MG awareness and also spread fun stuff on the world of VW travel;
  3. Wikipedia for its wealth of information, including these wonderful photos and historical facts about VW buses, shown below, and again a big thanks to all the contributors who share their knowledge so freely.


The following facts on the VW Type 2 Bus is taken from WIKIPEDIA  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_Type_2


Type 2, T1 “Camper”
Manufacturer initially: Volkswagen,
latterly: Volkswagen Commercial Vehicles
Also called Volkswagen Bus
Volkswagen Transporter
Volkswagen Kombi
Hippie Bus
Hippie Van
“Hippiemobile”
Production 1950–present
Successor Volkswagen Type 2 (T3)
Class Van / Minibus
Body style 4-door panel van
4-door minibus
2-door pickup (regular cab)
3-door pickup (crew cab)
Layout Longitudinal rear engine,
rear-wheel drive
Platform Volkswagen Transporter series

Type 2 Variants

Volkswagen Samba bus

1961 Volkswagen Type II flatbed pickup truck

Rail-going draisine

The Type 2 was available as a:

  • Panel van, a delivery van without side windows or rear seats.
  • Nippen Tucket, available in six colours, with or without doors.
  • Walk-Through Panel Van, a delivery van without side windows or rear seats and cargo doors on both sides.
  • High Roof Panel Van (GermanHochdach), a delivery van with raised roof.
  • Kombi, from GermanKombinationskraftwagen (combination motor vehicle), with side windows and removable rear seats, both a passenger and a cargo vehicle combined.
  • Bus, also called a Volkswagen Caravelle, a van with more comfortable interior reminiscent of passenger cars since the third generation.
  • Samba-Bus, a van with skylight windows and cloth sunroof, first generation only, also known as a Deluxe Microbus. They were marketed for touring the Alps,[9]
  • Flatbed pickup truck, or Single Cab, also available with wider load bed.
  • Crew cab pick-up, a flatbed truck with extended cab and two rows of seats, also called a Doka, from GermanDoppelkabine.
  • Westfalia camping van, “Westy”, with Westfalia roof and interior.
  • Adventurewagen camping van, with high roof and camping units from Adventurewagen.
  • Semi-camping van that can also still be used as a passenger car and transporter, sacrificing some camping comforts. “Multivan” or “Weekender”, available from the third generation on.

Apart from these factory variants, there were a multitude of third-party conversions available, some of which were offered through Volkswagen dealers. They included, but were not limited to, refrigerated vans, hearsesambulances, police vans, fire engines and ladder trucks, and camping van conversions by companies other than Westfalia. There were even 30 Klv 20 rail-going draisines built for Deutsche Bundesbahn in 1955.[10]

Names and nicknames

Like the Beetle, from the beginning, the Type 2 earned many nicknames from its fans. Among the most popular, at least in Germany, are VW-Bus and Bulli (or Bully) or Hippie-van or the bus. The Type 2 was meant to be officially named the Bully, but Heinrich Lanz, producer of the Lanz Bulldog farm tractor, intervened. The model was then presented as the Volkswagen Transporter and Volkswagen Kleinbus, but the Bully nickname still caught on.

The official German-language model names Transporter and Kombi (Kombinationskraftwagen, combined-use vehicle) have also caught on as nicknames. Kombi is not only the name of the passenger variant, but is also the Australasian and Brazilian term for the whole Type 2 family; in much the same way that they are all called VW-Bus in Germany, even the pickup truck variations. In Mexico, the German Kombi was translated as Combi, and became a household word thanks to the vehicle’s popularity in Mexico City‘s public transportation system. In Peru, where the term Combi was similarly adopted, the term Combi Asesina(Murdering Combi) is often used for buses of similar size, due to the notorious recklessness and competition of bus drivers in Lima to get passengers. In Portugal it is known as Pão-de-Forma (Breadloaf) because its design resembles a bread baked in a mold. Similarly, in Denmark, the Type 2 is referred to as Rugbrød (Rye bread).Finns dubbed it Kleinbus (mini-bus), as many taxicab companies adopted it for group transportation; the name Kleinbus has become an appellative for all passenger vans. The vehicle is also known as Kleinbus in Chile.

In the US, however, it is a VW bus, a “vee-dub”, a minibus, a hippie-mobile, hippie bus, or hippie van, “combie”, Microbus or a Transporter to aficionados. The early versions produced before 1967 used a split front windshield (giving rise to the nickname “Splitty”), and their comparative rarity has led to their becoming sought after by collectors and enthusiasts. The next version, sold in the US market from 1968 to 1979, is characterised by a large, curved windshield and is commonly called a “bay-window”. It was replaced by the Vanagon, of which only the Westfalia camper version has a common nickname, “Westy”.

It was called Volksie Bus in South Africa, notable in a series of that country’s TV commercials. Kombi is also a generic nickname for vans and minibuses in South Africa and Swaziland, often used as a means of public transportation. In Nigeria it was called Danfo.

In the UK, it is known as a “Campervan”, “hippy van”, “vdub”, “love machine of delight”, “Shaggin-Wagen” and as the more tongue-in-cheek “mind expanding van”.

References

  1. ^ “History of the Volkswagen bus”. Brinse.com. Retrieved 2011-08-19.
  2. ^ Patinkin, Mark/ “1969 was the most tumultuous and normal year”Providence Journal, 28 July 2009
  3. ^ Walters, Jeff. “Type 2 Roots”, in Hot VWs, 7/84, p.45.
  4. a b Walters, p.45.
  5. a b c d e f g h i j k Walters, p.46.
  6. a b c d e f g Walters, p.47.
  7. ^ Walter, p.46.
  8. a b Walters, p.94.
  9. ^ “Volkswagen camper van marks 60 years of production”. BBC. 4 June 2010.
  10. ^ “Klv 20 Draisine, VW Bus”. Eisenbahndienstfahrzeuge.de. Retrieved 2011-08-19.
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  1. […] more: Thank GOD for … « The 'YesWeCan' Journey … 2012 we'll be … ← VW CAMPERS BRIGHTON BREEZE 2008 | Volkswagen Videos […]

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