Type 2 VW bus (T2)

Here’s the third part of our story on the Type 2 VW bus, taken from Wikipedia.

[ source Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_Type_2 ]

Volkswagen Type 2 (T2)

1973–1980 Volkswagen Kombi (T2) van

1973–1980 Volkswagen Kombi (T2) van

Production August 1967 – July 1979 (Europe and US)
1971–1996 (Mexico)
1976–present (Brazil)
1981–1986 (Argentina)
Assembly Hanover, Germany
Emden, Germany
General Pacheco, Argentina
São Bernardo do Campo, Brazil
Puebla, Puebla, Mexico
Platform Volkswagen Transporter T2
Engine 1.6 L 35kW B4
1.6 L 37kW B4
1.7 L 46-49kW B4
1.8 L 50 kW B4
1.8 L 67 kW I4
2.0 L 52kW B4
Transmission 4-speed manual
3-speed automatic
Wheelbase 2,400 mm (94.5 in)
Length 4,505 mm (177.4 in)
Width 1,720 mm (67.7 in)
Height 2,040 mm (80.3 in)

In late 1967, the second generation of the Volkswagen Type 2 (T2) was introduced. It was built in Germany until 1979. In Mexico, the Volkswagen Combi and Panel were produced from 1970 to 1994. Models before 1971 are often called the T2a (or “Early Bay”), while models after 1972 are called the T2b (or “Late Bay”).

This second-generation Type 2 lost its distinctive split front windshield, and was slightly larger and considerably heavier than its predecessor. Its common nicknames are Breadloaf and Bay-window, or Loaf and Bay for short.[15] At 1.6 L and 35 kW (48 PS; 47 bhp) DIN, the engine was also slightly larger. The new model also did away with the swing axle rear suspension and transfer boxes previously used to raise ride height. Instead, half-shaft axles fitted withconstant velocity joints raised ride height without the wild changes in camber of the Beetle-based swing axle suspension. The updated Bus transaxle is usually sought after by off-road racers using air-cooled Volkswagen components.

The T2b was introduced by way of gradual change over three years. The first models featured rounded bumpers incorporating a step for use when the door was open (replaced by indented bumpers without steps on later models), front doors that opened to 90° from the body, no lip on the front guards, and crescent air intakes in the D-pillars (later models after the Type 4 engine option was offered, have squared off intakes). They also had unique engine hatches, and up until 1971 front indicators set low on the nose rather than high on either side of the fresh air grille – giving rise to their nickname as “Low Lights”. The 1971 Type 2 featured a new, 1.6 L engine with dual intake ports on each cylinder head and was DIN-rated at 37 kW (50 PS; 50 bhp). An important change came with the introduction of front disc brakes and new roadwheels with brake ventilation holes and flatter hubcaps. 1972’s most prominent change was a bigger engine compartment to fit the larger 1.7- to 2.0-litre engines from the Volkswagen Type 4, and a redesigned rear end which eliminated the removable rear apron. The air inlets were also enlarged to accommodate the increased cooling air needs of the larger engines.

In 1971 the 1600cc Type 1 engine as used in the Beetle, was supplemented with the 1700cc Type 4 engine – as it was originally designed for the Type 4 (411 and 412) models. European vans kept the option of upright fan Type 1 1600 engine but the 1700 Type 4 became standard for US spec models.

The year 1971 also saw exterior revisions including relocated front turn indicators, squared off and set higher in the valance, above the headlights – 1972 saw square-profiled bumpers, which became standard until the end of the T2 in 1979. Crash safety improved with this change due to a compressible structure behind the front bumper. This meant that the T2b was capable of meeting US safety standards for passenger cars of the time, though not required of vans. The “VW” emblem on the front valance became slightly smaller.

photo taken by Carole Brown of a 72 Bay window bus and her own 1971 on the right showing the differences in position of signal lights, size of VW logo and shape of front bumper

References

11. ^ Dolan, Matthew (22 September 2009). “To outfox the Chicken Tax, Ford strips its own vans”The Wall Street Journal.

12. ^ “The Big Three’s shameful secret”Freetrade.org, Daniel J. Ikenson, 6 July 2003.

13. ^ a b c Ikenson, Daniel. “Ending the “Chicken War”: The case for abolishing the 25 percent Truck Tariff”. The Cato Institute.

14. ^ a b c Bradsher, Keith (30 November 1997). “Light Trucks increase profits, but foul air more than cars”The New York Times. Retrieved 27 May 2010.

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Likes and VW bugs

Our post two days ago brought several new people to view this blog, which was really great because I’ve been writing this for over two years now and wondering how to continue to interest readers.

One of our new likes was from Bandwagen, who share our love of photography and VWs.

Here’s a cracking photo from their site of a beautiful VW beetle that won a competition in the UK way back in 1986, the first year that the CAL look was a new category at VW Action, Europe’s biggest Volkswagen show.


Winning Pink VW Beetle! Photo courtesy of bandwagen.wordpress.com

P.S. I often notice how our interest in others’ articles or the reasons we write our own are because of connections. In this case I’m connected in three ways: I am a Brit, writing this from California and my interest in vintage VW beetles has been recently kindled!

Type 2 VW bus (T1)

Since Wednesday’s post was so popular, I have again taken information from the wonderful pages of wikipedia.

More from Wikipedia on the Type 2 VW bus

Volkswagen Type 2 (T1)

Volkswagen T1c Kombi
Production 1950–1967 (Europe and US)
1950–1975 (Brazil)
Assembly Wolfsburg, Germany
Hanover, Germany
São Bernardo do Campo, Brazil
Platform Volkswagen Transporter T1
Engine 1.1 L 18kW B4
1.2 L 22kW B4
1.2 L 30 kW B4
1.5 L 31-38kW B4

The first generation of the Volkswagen Type 2 with the split windshield, informally called the MicrobusSplitscreen, or Splittie among modern fans, was produced from 8 March 1950 through the end of the 1967 model year. From 1950 to 1956, the T1 was built in Wolfsburg; from 1956, it was built at the completely new Transporter factory in Hanover. Like the Beetle, the first Transporters used the 1100 Volkswagen air-cooled engine, an 1,131 cc (69.0 cu in), DIN-rated 18 kW (24 PS; 24 bhp), air-cooled flat-four-cylinder ‘boxer’ engine mounted in the rear. This was upgraded to the 1200 – an 1,192 cc (72.7 cu in) 22 kW (30 PS; 30 bhp) in 1953. A higher compression ratio became standard in 1955; while an unusual early version of the 30 kW (41 PS; 40 bhp) engine debuted exclusively on the Type 2 in 1959. This engine proved to be so uncharacteristically troublesome that Volkswagen recalled all 1959 Transporters and replaced the engines with an updated version of the 30 kW engine. Any 1959 models that retain that early engine today are true survivors. Since the engine was totally discontinued at the outset, no parts were ever made available.

The early versions of the T1 until 1955 were often called the “Barndoor” (retrospectively called T1a since the 1990s), owing to the enormous rear engine cover, while the later versions with a slightly modified body (the roofline above the windshield is extended), smaller engine bay, and 15″ roadwheels instead of the original 16″ ones are nowadays called the T1b (again, only called this since the 1990s, based on VW’s restrospective T1,2,3,4 etc. naming system.). From the 1964 model year, when the rear door was made wider (same as on the bay-window or T2), the vehicle could be referred to as the T1c. 1964 also saw the introduction of an optional sliding door for the passenger/cargo area instead of the outwardly hinged doors typical of cargo vans.

In 1962, a heavy-duty Transporter was introduced as a factory option. It featured a cargo capacity of 1,000 kg (2,205 lb) instead of the previous 750 kg (1,653 lb), smaller but wider 14″ roadwheels, and a 1.5 Le, 31 kW (42 PS; 42 bhp) DIN engine. This was so successful that only a year later, the 750 kg, 1.2 L Transporter was discontinued. The 1963 model year introduced the 1500 engine – 1,493 cc (91.1 cu in) as standard equipment to the US market at 38 kW (52 PS; 51 bhp) DIN with an 83 mm (3.27 in) bore, 69 mm (2.72 in) stroke, and 7.8:1 compression ratio. When the Beetle received the 1.5 L engine for the 1967 model year, its power was increased to 40 kW (54 PS; 54 bhp) DIN.

1966 Volkswagen Kombi (North America)

German production stopped after the 1967 model year; however, the T1 still was made in Brazil until 1975, when it was modified with a 1968–79 T2-style front end, and big 1972-vintage taillights into the so-called “T1.5” and produced until 1996. The Brazilian T1s were not identical to the last German models (the T1.5 was locally produced in Brazil using the 1950s and 1960s-era stamping dies to cut down on retooling, alongside the Beetle/Fusca, where the pre-1965 body style was retained), though they sported some characteristic features of the T1a, such as the cargo doors and five-stud 205 mm (8.1 in) PCD) rims.

Among American enthusiasts, it is common to refer to the different models by the number of their windows. The basic Kombi or Bus is the 11-window (a.k.a. three-window bus because of three side windows) with a split windshield, two front cabin door windows, six rear side windows, and one rear window. The DeLuxe model featured eight rear side windows and two rear corner windows, making it the 15-window (not available in Europe). Meanwhile, the sunroof DeLuxe with its additional eight small skylight windows is, accordingly, the 23-window. From the 1964 model year, with its wider rear door, the rear corner windows were discontinued, making the latter two the 13-window and 21-window respectively. The 23- and later 21-window variants each carry the nickname ‘Samba’, or in Australia, officially ‘Alpine’.

Volkswagen light trucks and the US Chicken Tax  

U.S. sales of Volkswagen vans in pickup and commercial configurations were curtailed by the Chicken tax

Certain models of the Volkswagen Type 2 played a role in an historic episode during the early 1960s, known as the Chicken War. France and West Germany had placed tariffs on imports of U.S. chicken.[11] Diplomacy failed,[12] and in January 1964, two months after taking office, President Johnson imposed a 25% tax (almost ten times the average U.S. tariff)[13] on potato starch, dextrin, brandy, and light trucks.[13] Officially, the tax targeted items imported from Europe as approximating the value of lost American chicken sales to Europe.[14]

In retrospect, audio tapes from the Johnson White House, revealed a quid pro quo unrelated to chicken. In January 1964, President Johnson attempted to convince United Auto Workers’ president Walter Reuther not to initiate a strike just prior to the 1964 election, and to support the president’s civil rights platform. Reuther, in turn, wanted Johnson to respond to Volkswagen’s increased shipments to the United States.[14]

The Chicken Tax directly curtailed importation of German-built Type 2s in configurations that qualified them as light trucks – that is, commercial vans (panel vans) and pickups.[14] In 1964, U.S. imports of automobile trucks from West Germany declined to a value of $5.7 million – about one-third the value imported in the previous year. After 1971, Volkswagen cargo vans and pickup trucks, the intended targets, “practically disappeared from the U.S. market”.[13] While post-1971 Type 2 commercial vans and single-cab and double-cab pickups can be found in the United States today, they are exceedingly rare. As of 2009, the Chicken tax remains in effect.

[ source Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_Type_2 ]

Remember to …

… check out why we’re driving for Vehicles Working for Causes and where we are now in our 1971 VW Westfalia

Thank GOD for …

My top three appreciations are for:

  1. WordPress for its wonderful blogging software and the philosophy of programmers sharing their skills for free;
  2. Facebook for the networking and opportunities to grow support for my campaign for MG awareness and also spread fun stuff on the world of VW travel;
  3. Wikipedia for its wealth of information, including these wonderful photos and historical facts about VW buses, shown below, and again a big thanks to all the contributors who share their knowledge so freely.


The following facts on the VW Type 2 Bus is taken from WIKIPEDIA  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_Type_2


Type 2, T1 “Camper”
Manufacturer initially: Volkswagen,
latterly: Volkswagen Commercial Vehicles
Also called Volkswagen Bus
Volkswagen Transporter
Volkswagen Kombi
Hippie Bus
Hippie Van
“Hippiemobile”
Production 1950–present
Successor Volkswagen Type 2 (T3)
Class Van / Minibus
Body style 4-door panel van
4-door minibus
2-door pickup (regular cab)
3-door pickup (crew cab)
Layout Longitudinal rear engine,
rear-wheel drive
Platform Volkswagen Transporter series

Type 2 Variants

Volkswagen Samba bus

1961 Volkswagen Type II flatbed pickup truck

Rail-going draisine

The Type 2 was available as a:

  • Panel van, a delivery van without side windows or rear seats.
  • Nippen Tucket, available in six colours, with or without doors.
  • Walk-Through Panel Van, a delivery van without side windows or rear seats and cargo doors on both sides.
  • High Roof Panel Van (GermanHochdach), a delivery van with raised roof.
  • Kombi, from GermanKombinationskraftwagen (combination motor vehicle), with side windows and removable rear seats, both a passenger and a cargo vehicle combined.
  • Bus, also called a Volkswagen Caravelle, a van with more comfortable interior reminiscent of passenger cars since the third generation.
  • Samba-Bus, a van with skylight windows and cloth sunroof, first generation only, also known as a Deluxe Microbus. They were marketed for touring the Alps,[9]
  • Flatbed pickup truck, or Single Cab, also available with wider load bed.
  • Crew cab pick-up, a flatbed truck with extended cab and two rows of seats, also called a Doka, from GermanDoppelkabine.
  • Westfalia camping van, “Westy”, with Westfalia roof and interior.
  • Adventurewagen camping van, with high roof and camping units from Adventurewagen.
  • Semi-camping van that can also still be used as a passenger car and transporter, sacrificing some camping comforts. “Multivan” or “Weekender”, available from the third generation on.

Apart from these factory variants, there were a multitude of third-party conversions available, some of which were offered through Volkswagen dealers. They included, but were not limited to, refrigerated vans, hearsesambulances, police vans, fire engines and ladder trucks, and camping van conversions by companies other than Westfalia. There were even 30 Klv 20 rail-going draisines built for Deutsche Bundesbahn in 1955.[10]

Names and nicknames

Like the Beetle, from the beginning, the Type 2 earned many nicknames from its fans. Among the most popular, at least in Germany, are VW-Bus and Bulli (or Bully) or Hippie-van or the bus. The Type 2 was meant to be officially named the Bully, but Heinrich Lanz, producer of the Lanz Bulldog farm tractor, intervened. The model was then presented as the Volkswagen Transporter and Volkswagen Kleinbus, but the Bully nickname still caught on.

The official German-language model names Transporter and Kombi (Kombinationskraftwagen, combined-use vehicle) have also caught on as nicknames. Kombi is not only the name of the passenger variant, but is also the Australasian and Brazilian term for the whole Type 2 family; in much the same way that they are all called VW-Bus in Germany, even the pickup truck variations. In Mexico, the German Kombi was translated as Combi, and became a household word thanks to the vehicle’s popularity in Mexico City‘s public transportation system. In Peru, where the term Combi was similarly adopted, the term Combi Asesina(Murdering Combi) is often used for buses of similar size, due to the notorious recklessness and competition of bus drivers in Lima to get passengers. In Portugal it is known as Pão-de-Forma (Breadloaf) because its design resembles a bread baked in a mold. Similarly, in Denmark, the Type 2 is referred to as Rugbrød (Rye bread).Finns dubbed it Kleinbus (mini-bus), as many taxicab companies adopted it for group transportation; the name Kleinbus has become an appellative for all passenger vans. The vehicle is also known as Kleinbus in Chile.

In the US, however, it is a VW bus, a “vee-dub”, a minibus, a hippie-mobile, hippie bus, or hippie van, “combie”, Microbus or a Transporter to aficionados. The early versions produced before 1967 used a split front windshield (giving rise to the nickname “Splitty”), and their comparative rarity has led to their becoming sought after by collectors and enthusiasts. The next version, sold in the US market from 1968 to 1979, is characterised by a large, curved windshield and is commonly called a “bay-window”. It was replaced by the Vanagon, of which only the Westfalia camper version has a common nickname, “Westy”.

It was called Volksie Bus in South Africa, notable in a series of that country’s TV commercials. Kombi is also a generic nickname for vans and minibuses in South Africa and Swaziland, often used as a means of public transportation. In Nigeria it was called Danfo.

In the UK, it is known as a “Campervan”, “hippy van”, “vdub”, “love machine of delight”, “Shaggin-Wagen” and as the more tongue-in-cheek “mind expanding van”.

References

  1. ^ “History of the Volkswagen bus”. Brinse.com. Retrieved 2011-08-19.
  2. ^ Patinkin, Mark/ “1969 was the most tumultuous and normal year”Providence Journal, 28 July 2009
  3. ^ Walters, Jeff. “Type 2 Roots”, in Hot VWs, 7/84, p.45.
  4. a b Walters, p.45.
  5. a b c d e f g h i j k Walters, p.46.
  6. a b c d e f g Walters, p.47.
  7. ^ Walter, p.46.
  8. a b Walters, p.94.
  9. ^ “Volkswagen camper van marks 60 years of production”. BBC. 4 June 2010.
  10. ^ “Klv 20 Draisine, VW Bus”. Eisenbahndienstfahrzeuge.de. Retrieved 2011-08-19.

A heartflet PLEA for MG

Hello everyone. I slept last night in WalMart in Redlands, CA

The YesWeCan CamperVan parked overnight in WalMart, Redlands, CA, USA overnight Monday 5 March 2012

and somehow today has started very emotionally. I have been in tears this morning, because I want to do so much for patients with MG but sometimes I get overwhelmed with wanting to do so much and having just me to do it. I know you all have your own priorities and challenges, but today I really need your support.

Sunday I had the idea to plan a fun drive for MG Awareness in this area of CA from Orange County to San Bernadino county but right now I am feeling it’s all a pipe dream as there are a few more pressing issues that are getting me down today. I need a few things to happen first and foremost and maybe you can spread the word in your circles to get the word out about my MG awareness campaign (http://vw4causes.org/mg-awareness/) and read the web pages yourself to see why the patients need our support.

It’s not just the patients who feel forgotten and uncared for, it’s all those poor people (babies, children and adults) with symptoms who are being missed or mis-diagnosed whose bodies are being attacked by their overactive immune system. The longer they take to diagnosis the more likely they are to get so much worse and have treatment be less effective. There is so much work I want to do. And I implore you to read the Vehicles Working for Causes website to inform yourself.

Then we come down to the nitty gritty of what’s holding me back from campaigning more right now. Way back in December in Houston, TX, I spent $200 of my own money on stickers to sell to raise gas money for this trip. I have sold only a handful. I have sold less than a dozen T shirts. Not only do I need $ but I need some space to sleep in my VW without boxes & T shirts and heavy things to move around. My back is hurting again and my arthritic knees are throbbing.  Please visit http://vw4causes.org/support/items-for-sale/ and see if you can help by purchasing some stickers or a small item to help with the gas  money. Out here in CA it’s almost $4.50 per gallon. Also please ask your friends to look around the website to see why MG awareness is so very important.

THANK YOU 🙂